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A Windows 10 desktop featuring the April 2019 Update's new light theme

Windows 10’s latest update is the May 2019 Update, which is version 1903 and was codenamed 19H1 during development. It features a light theme, speed improvements, and lots of polish. There are no crazy new features like My People or Timeline. And it’s out, today.

This article includes everything new as of Insider Preview build 18362.30, released on April 4, 2019. Microsoft previously called this Windows 10’s April 2019 Update, but it was delayed until they just announced that it will begin rolling out to everybody.

Big Changes to Windows Update

Choice to install a feature update in Windows Update
Microsoft

Microsoft announced it’s making big changes to the way Windows 10 updates. You’ll have much more control over the way Windows 10 installs updates—or not.

Specifically, Windows 10 will no longer automatically install big updates like the May 2019 Update and October 2018 Update every six months without your permission. Now, you’ll see a notification and it’s your choice when you want to install the update.

Don’t want to install the update? That’s fine. You can keep using your current version of Windows 10 for as long as it’s supported with security updates—that’s 18 months after release. But, once every 18 months, you will be forced to update to keep getting security fixes. This is much better than once every six months, and it gives you a lot more control.

On top of that, Microsoft will now let Home users pause updates—just as Professional users can—for up to 35 days. You must pause in seven day periods, but you can pause up to five times. And, after you check for updates in Windows Update, Windows won’t automatically install them—you’ll have a choice to pause the updates, if you like.

RELATED: Microsoft Abandons Windows 10’s Constant Forced Updates

Speed Improvements (Thanks to Better Spectre Fixes)

A snail superimposed over a CPU, demonstrating Spectre slowdowns
VLADGRIN/Shutterstock.com

The news of Spectre shook the industry at the start of 2018. Spectre is a design flaw in CPUs, and it allows programs to escape their restrictions and read other programs’ memory spaces. Microsoft patched Windows to help block Spectre attacks, but the resulting patches reduced your PC’s performance in some scenarios—especially on PCs from 2015 and earlier, which don’t have the CPU features needed to speed up the fix.

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